Thai princess will stand for PM in unprecedented move by a royal


A Thai princess will run for prime minister in March elections in an unprecedented entry by a royal into frontline politics.  

Princess Ubolratana, 67, the older sister of Thai King Maha Vajiralongkorn, will take on the chief of the ruling junta in a battle that will redraw the nation’s political landscape.  

She will stand for the Thai Raksa Chart party, steered by the divisive Shinawatra political clan, whose leader Preechapol Pongpanich showed reporters her application for candiancy today.  

Thai Princess Ubolratana (pictured in 2017) has entered the political fray and will stand for Prime Minister in March despite the royal family traditionally remaining above politics 

Thai Princess Ubolratana (pictured in 2017) has entered the political fray and will stand for Prime Minister in March despite the royal family traditionally remaining above politics 

She will take on junta chief and Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha (pictured) who came to power in a military coup in 2004

She will take on junta chief and Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha (pictured) who came to power in a military coup in 2004

She will take on junta chief and Thai Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha (pictured) who came to power in a military coup in 2004

Thailand has not had a royal as premier since becoming a constitutional monarchy in 1932. 

The Thai royal family, a revered institution shielded from criticism by a tough defamation law, has traditionally been seen as above the political fray, although royals have intervened in moments of political crisis. 

Ubolratana is a colourful and public-facing figure who has played  lead roles in Thai films, and amassed a sizeable Instagram following

Ubolratana is a colourful and public-facing figure who has played  lead roles in Thai films, and amassed a sizeable Instagram following

Ubolratana is a colourful and public-facing figure who has played lead roles in Thai films, and amassed a sizeable Instagram following

Ubolratana’s nomination has electrified the buildup to a March 24 election which had seemed poised to return the junta and its proxies to power in some form.

The upcoming election is the country’s first since the current Prime Minister, army general Prayut Chan-o-cha, took power in 2014 a military coup.

Mr Prayut overthrew the democratic government of Yingluck Shinawatra, the younger sister of former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra. 

Ubolratana’s involvement for a party allied to Mr Shinawatra – a billionaire self-exiled former premier, who stands at the heart of Thailand’s bitter political schism – gives a royal sheen to his political machine, which has won every election since 2001.    

It potentially builds a bridge between Thaksin’s ‘Red’ shirted supporters and the ‘Yellow’ shirts who are arch royalists. Deadly violence and disruption linked to the two groups has defined Thailand’s turbulent last decade.

‘The board agrees that the name of Princess Ubolratana, an educated and skilled person, is the most suitable choice,’ Thai Raksa Chart party leader Preechapol Pongpanich told reporters.

Thai Raksa Chart party leader Preechapol Pongpanich, holds up application of candidate for Prime Minister, Thailand's Princess Ubolratana on February 8. The party is steered by divisive former PM Thaksin Shinawatra, whose sister's government was overthrown by the current premier Mr Prayut

Thai Raksa Chart party leader Preechapol Pongpanich, holds up application of candidate for Prime Minister, Thailand's Princess Ubolratana on February 8. The party is steered by divisive former PM Thaksin Shinawatra, whose sister's government was overthrown by the current premier Mr Prayut

Thai Raksa Chart party leader Preechapol Pongpanich, holds up application of candidate for Prime Minister, Thailand’s Princess Ubolratana on February 8. The party is steered by divisive former PM Thaksin Shinawatra, whose sister’s government was overthrown by the current premier Mr Prayut

The party falls under the tutelage of Thaksin, who is loathed by the army and Bangkok elite, yet adored by the rural poor.

The announcement thrusts him back to the centre stage of Thailand’s political drama just as it appeared the military were set to succeed in sidelining him.

He was toppled in a 2006 coup, while his sister Yingluck was booted from power in a 2014 military takeover and forced into exile to avoid a jail term.

Who is Princess Ubolratana?

Born in 1951, Princess Ubolratana Rajakanya Sirivadhana Barnavadi is the first-born child of the late King Bhumibol Adulyadej.  

She is a colourful, public-facing royal in contrast to her more restrained brother King Maha Vajiralongkorn. 

Ubolratana attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and relinquished her royal titles after marrying the American Peter Jensen in 1972.

But the couple divorced and she moved back to Thailand in 2001, where she is still considered part of the royal family and re-immersed herself in royal life.

There she experienced tragedy, losing her son Poom to the 2004 Asian tsunami.

She has two other children who now also live in Thailand.  

She is known to the public for lead roles in Thai films, onstage singing performances, a vibrant fashion sense and a sizeable Instagram following.

The princess’s move deals a heavy blow to the aspirations of Mr Prayut, the junta head, who has spent nearly five years trying to recast the political system to limit the power of elected governments and prepare his own return as a civilian leader.

In a day of high drama, Prayut declared his candidacy for premier, running for the Phalang Pracharat army party, moments after the princess’s announcement.

‘I want to reassure that I do not intend to hang on to power. It is not easy for me to make my decision… it is a crucial moment for the country,’ he said. 

The military under Prayut has cast itself as the protector of the monarchy.

But Ubolratana’s shock entrance into politics, aligned with the junta’s nemesis – the Shinawatra family – undercuts those claims. 

Analysts said she is not technically covered by the kingdom’s royal defamation law – which carries heavy jail sentences – but that given the wide interpretation of the rules, she is unlikely to face the scrutiny given to most politicians.

‘Who would dare criticise a royal prime minister?’ said Puangthong Pawakapan, professor of political science at Chulalongkorn University.

The stride into politics by a royal has left Thais scrambling to work out what it may mean for the nation’s tattered democracy.

‘This is quite unprecedented and nobody is prepared for this,’ Professor Anusorn Unno, of Thammasat University, told AFP.

Princess Ubolratana of Thailand has been nominated as a candidate for Prime Minister of Thailand by the Thai Raksa Chart political party. If she wins it will be the first royal premiership since Thailand became a constitutional monarchy in 1932 

Princess Ubolratana of Thailand has been nominated as a candidate for Prime Minister of Thailand by the Thai Raksa Chart political party. If she wins it will be the first royal premiership since Thailand became a constitutional monarchy in 1932 

Princess Ubolratana of Thailand has been nominated as a candidate for Prime Minister of Thailand by the Thai Raksa Chart political party. If she wins it will be the first royal premiership since Thailand became a constitutional monarchy in 1932 

‘I don’t think it’s the victory for the people; I think this is part of the adaptation of the ruling elite in terms of changing the landscape of politics.’

Since ascending the throne in 2016, King Maha Vajiralongkorn has reorganised palace affairs.

The vastly wealthy Crown Property Bureau is now under his personal stewardship, he has appointed several new privy counsellors and established a highly trained personal guard.

Crucially he has appointed a new army chief from a different faction of the military to the ruling junta.

His coronation will be held in May. 



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